New Research Behind Ketamine’s Molecular Process

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At Numinus, we’ve watched ketamine help our patients, and we’re witnessing it change the landscape of psychiatry for good. Compared to traditional medications, ketamine has rapid antidepressant effects, often evident within an hour. For people with treatment-resistant depression, ketamine has shown 50-70% response rates. And we know that here at Cedar. We’ve seen it.

Scientists are rushing to understand the molecular process that makes ketamine so fast-acting and effective. This new research from Sweden focuses on serotonin, which has long been implicated in depression. Researchers studied a specific serotonin binding site and found that after ketamine treatment, patients had an increase in serotonin 1b receptors. While this illuminates a particular aspect of the molecular mechanisms behind ketamine’s efficacy, the total process is still evolving. Concluding the study, the scientists called for more research to help us understand this powerfully therapeutic drug.

We know intimately the low clinical response rates and delayed onset of action of traditional antidepressants, and while they help for some, others need alternatives. That’s why new treatment options are vital. It’s why we stay up to date on current studies and host research of emerging neuropsychiatric treatments—it’s why our Principal Investigator and founder Reid Robison MD MBA has led over 100 clinical trials.

Call us anytime at 1-833-NUMINUS (686-4687), we’re here to help.


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